Tag: leadership judo

EP 111 – THE SYNERGIST AND LEADERSHIP JUDO

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EP 111 - THE SYNERGIST AND LEADERSHIP JUDO
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We’re back and wrapping up the Leadership Judo series, this time talking about the Synergist Leadership Style. This style is an important one and there are some unique dynamics in understanding, working with and accepting the contributions of a Synergist.

Here are some of the key highlights

  • Ask a Synergist to help you get people on board with an idea or initiative-they have great people skills and can build unity among team members.
  • Conflict often occurs between a Synergist and the Operator. The Operator can be viewed as too blunt and down to business by the Synergist who the operator thinks just focuses on talking and doing nothing of real substance.
  • The Synergist may default to inaction when the team or staff fails to develop consensus-it is important to help them move forward recognizing that you’ll never have 100% of your people/team/congregation on board.
  • They Synergist is a great relationship builder and can get a good read on people-connect with them to understand what might be taking place within your congregation.

We’d love to hear your thoughts-drop us a line, a text or call into the bootcamp hotline and leave us your questions or comments.

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EPISODE #110 – Processors and Leadership Judo

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EPISODE #110 - Processors and Leadership Judo
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This week the guys continue their series in Leadership Judo through the VOPS leadership styles by Les McKeown in his book The Synergist

  • THE MIND OF A PROCESSOR (quotes are from ch. 4 of The Synergist)
  • Processors feel compelled to bring order to all they see. They’re easy to recognize not just in business, but in every walk of life—Processors color-code their wardrobes, arrange their books by subject, and know the replacement date for their water filters.”
  • “So, unlike the Operator—who’s first thought when faced with a task is ‘Let’s get started’—a Processor’s first through is ‘What system or process can I put in place to ensure that this task is performed consistently in the future?’”
  • “Allied to the Processor’s need for order is their aversion to risk. . . The processor’s risk-aversion often manifests itself as a resistance to change.”
  • For a processor, data is all important. More precise than experience, more accurate than judgment, data is the fundamental currency in which the Processor trades.”
  • “It is important for Processors that whatever they do, the do it right. . . While this is usually a good thing—bringing precision is why the Processor is there after all—on occasion Processors can be so preoccupied with ‘doing the thing right’ at the expense of ‘doing the right thing that they lose sight of the organization’s overall business needs.”
  • Processor Strengths
    • Consistency and repeatability
    • Scalability
    • Accuracy
    • Control
    • Clinical perspective
  • Processor Weaknesses
    • Invariable pace
    • Resistance to risk and change
    • Overanalysis
    • Default to no

LEADERSHIP JUDO PRINCIPLES

  • Respect their principles
    • Be punctual – schedule in advance and show up on time and end at or before the scheduled end time
    • Be prepared – have data, know what you are talking about or asking
    • Be precise – don’t exaggerate or be ambiguous
      • Processors love the integrity of data and are easily frustrated with ambiguity or exaggeration. “Frequent use of broad sweeping statements will eventually, in the eyes of the processor, undermine the credibility of the people making those statements.”
  • Set precise goals (with deadlines)
    • Set realistic deadlines for new initiatives (V – 7x – O – 7x – P)
    • Be overly specific about what you want
    • Avoid informal chats as meetings
  • Be quick to listen
    • Many processors do not feel like they usually get a fair hearing of their perspective.
    • Don’t multitask – put your phone on silent and give them your undivided attention.
  • Show appreciation for their work and their perspective
    • Processors are often unsung heroes
      • And sometimes unnecessarily viewed as villains to Visionaries and Operators
  • Challenge constructively
    • Don’t challenge them with anecdotes – challenge with data
    • Ask clarifying questions about the data to gain a better understanding
    • Pushed into a corner to choose you, the org, or the data the Processor will choose the data
  • Build trust with them
    • Trust comes from credibility
    • Be consistent with your walk and talk

LINKS

The Synergist by Les McKeown

Free leadership style quiz CLICK HERE

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EPISODE #109 – Leadership Judo with Operators

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EPISODE #109 - Leadership Judo with Operators
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This week the boys have been traveling to and fro, encouraging Pastors and Associations on the road in TX, planning some great stuff in Bob’s home town of STL and sampling the local cuisine.  But since you don’t tune in for food alone they get down to another EP on Leadership Judo, discussing the Operator Leadership Style.

Here are some of the highlights of the Operator personalities:

  • Operators have a bias toward action
  • Operators are often strong internal consultants
  • Operators tend to overcommit
  • Operators are hard to find

The guys provide some super secret leadership judo moves to use with Operators who are in your church within the heart of this EP.

Leave us your comments, drop us a question and remember to tell others about the Bootcamp!

LINKS

The Synergist by Les McKeown

Free leadership style quiz CLICK HERE

STL Sandwich, Gioa’s Deli

Sinaloa’s Breakfast Burrito in TX City

The Truth BBQ in Houston TX

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EPISODE #108 – Leadership Judo with Visionary Leaders

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EPISODE #108 - Leadership Judo with Visionary Leaders
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The Bootcamp Bros are back talking about Leadership Judo. What is leadership judo you ask? You can listen to last week’s podcast and get up to speed.

Here’s a quick definition to get you ready for this episode.

Leadership Judo: taking the energy of an opponent and directing it away from harm to a more productive place.

We’re going to get specific over the next few EPs in applying leadership judo to some of the leadership styles we encounter in our churches, businesses and organizations.  Today’s leadership style-The Visionary.

Here are some highlights (check the audio for detail)

When working with or Leading Visionaries

  • Hear them out
  • Ask, don’t tell
  • Be flexible and fun
  • Check in regularly

Are you a visionary?  Concerned your leadership style is creating chaos? Check out the bonus EP for some helpful tips on how to “judo yourself.”

LINKS

Free leadership style quiz CLICK HERE

Bonus episode for Visionary leaders CLICK HERE

Russ Taff and his Bell Buckle Weekend

 

Do some serious Judo on your church website by calling our friends at One Eighty Digital, they can get you up and running with their expertise. Tell them the boys at the Bootcamp sent you.

Drop us a line, a question and a comment, we’d love to hear from you!

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EPISODE #107 – LEADERSHIP JUDO

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EPISODE #107 - LEADERSHIP JUDO
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Grab your Judogi and join Jimbo and Bob in the dojo for some leadership lessons on this bootcamp as we talk about the concept of Leadership Judo.

Leadership Judo: taking the energy of an opponent and directing it away from harm to a more productive place.

VERBAL JUDO vs VERBAL KARATE (from Verbal Judo)

  • “Karate is defined by sharp, quick blows delivered with hands and feet. . . VERBAL KARATE is the lashing out, as if with the side of a calloused hand, when you snap at your spouse, your children, your employer, your employees, anyone.”
  • “Physical Judo was invented by a Dr. Kano in 1882. It was a derivative of jiujitsu, which means ‘pain.’ . . Judo means the gentle way, rather than the painful way.”

Some guiding verses mentioned in the podcast

Ephesians 4:29

Let no corrupting talk come out of your mouths, but only such as is good for building up, as fits the occasion, that it may give grace to those who hear.

Proverbs 15:1

A soft word turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger

Five Truths for All from Verbal Judo by Johnson and Jenkins (yes, that Jenkins)

  1. All cultures want to be respected and treated with dignity, regardless of the situation. When treated with disrespect, all people want to fight and get revenge.
  2. All people would rather be asked than told what to do. To ask is a sign of respect; to tell is often a sign of disrespect.
  3. All people want to know ‘why’ they are being asked or told to do something. Telling people ‘why’ is another sign of respect.
  4. All people would rather have options than threats. Again, offering people a choice of action shows respect and allows people to save personal face.
  5. Finally, all people want a second chance to make matters right.

LEARN YOUR LEADERSHIP STYLE (VOPS) WITH THIS FREE SURVEY

Do some serious Judo on your church website by calling our friends at One Eighty Digital, they can get you up and running with their expertise. Tell them the boys at the Bootcamp sent you.

Drop us a line, a question and a comment, we’d love to hear from you!

 

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